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Learning and caring together

Wednesday 3rd February

9:009:3010:1510:3011:1511:301:302:003:00
EnglishEnglish
Zoom
Drop-in
SpellingReadingMathsMaths
Zoom
Drop-in
HistoryHistory
Zoom
Drop-in
Story Time
Please try to follow the timetable as closely as you possibly can.

Please could I encourage all parents and children to ask if you would like your reading books changed as this can be easily arranged. Also, would it be possible to please send photos of your children’s reading records on a Monday or Friday to show evidence that you/your child has read 3 times that week. We want you to get credit for your achievements!

For your reading session from today until Thursday, to celebrate National Storytelling Week, you can take the opportunity to join a Zoom session at 10:30 and listen to me tell you a story (a story which will continue for 4 days) which I have written for you. Because you is all proper mint and I think you deserve you own piece of fiction! The story will also be presented underneath in the reading section but to listen to me and let me do the work for you may give it a different slant. I will then set a task following the story. Give it a go.

This week is Mental Health Week, we will be completing activities throughout the week and then on Friday we will be having a technology free day and celebrating Rainbow Day. Please check Marvellous Me to find out more information about this.

English

Invite to Join Year 6 English Drop-in Zoom Meeting (09:30)

https://zoom.us/j/92178296497?pwd=YVlaVE5ZVE1leWxYbmg2WUJSaG9kZz09

Meeting ID: 936 5872 0707
Passcode: iuW95h

SPaG: Use of apostrophes

Apostrophes can be used to show that something belongs to someone or something. This is called possession. When we are talking about more than one thing, we call this plural.

The dogs’ leads were too long

If the noun is plural and ends with an s, we just attach the apostrophe to it without an additional s.

The children’s lunch was delayed.

If the noun is plural and does not end with s, we add ’s to the end.

LC: To describe the newly designed clock tower:

A beautiful dancer spends all of her life stuck at the top of the clock tower.  She spins on her toes incessantly in order for the clock to work. 

One day she becomes curious about the world outside, especially the balloons that float past her window.  

As she steps into the outside world something has changed.  All the colour has gone from the world and everything is frozen in time. 

The only thing that can bring it to life is our beautiful dancer, powering the clock again.

Your task today: Using your newly designed and created clock tower and surrounding words and noun phrases, your job today is to create a setting description telling me all about your wonderful creation.

Consider all you grammar elements to do this and remind yourself of how good description works. Use a range of sentence types and sentence openers, consider different types of punctuation to negotiate the speed and flow of your writing, use powerful verbs and exciting adjectives, try to embed a clause, think about the active and passive voice, what about similes, metaphors, alliteration, personification…so much to choose from.

Let me give you an example of my own:

Although the old clock tower had been there for centuries, that it still shone like newly polished glass was a mystery to all who laid their eyes upon it. Nobody knew how long it had been there mind you. Was the clock tower there first or the village? A mystery that retreats into the past further than living word.

Its spire was as white as chalk and its contrast with the clay covered road only furthered its beauty. Copper binding wrapped its trunk and a golden belt separated the clock tower from the clock’s nest itself. Proudly, the clock stood upon its nest, and with its shining cap it surveyed the village with an air of superiority and grandeur.

Clockwork Tower – Super slow writes! - Kingsleigh Primary School
Dear Parents/Carers, Please find below the Home Learning timetable. We have  structured it so that you and your child know what i
The Clock Tower - YouTube
Spelling

Here are the spellings for this week:

Mr Emmerson’s Spelling Group: stationary, stationery, steal, steel, wary, weary, whose, whose, existence, explanation, familiar, foreign, forty, frequently, identity, individual, interrupt, language, leisure, lightning
(There are a number of homophones in these spellings so please ensure that you use the correct definition for the correct spelling)

Mrs Oakley’s Spelling Group: government, development, different, moment, management, present, department, president, patient, movement, event, student, agreement, environment, treatment

Focus on the spellings from your group and complete the following activities:

Spelling Activity:

Please choose an activity from your pack to practise your spellings today please. REMEMBER, your spelling test is tomorrow so make sure you are prepared and ready for test itself the best that you can be.

All of these spellings are on Spelling Shed under either Spring Week 5 Mrs Oakley or Spring Week 5 Mr Emmerson

Reading

Reading session for this week only:
https://zoom.us/j/98137936051?pwd=YnllekIvNFhUUUJMdkV0N1Vua1FVUT09

Meeting ID: 981 3793 6051
Passcode: xm41V2

Brian Discovers Rodeo

Chapter 1: The Decision (The immediate danger, a new opportunity) (continued)

It just so happened that the mascara wearing didn’t only catch the attention of the female turkeys, it also made him very popular with the foxes. Oh, they loved him so much and it just so happened that a meal was also one of their planned activities. However, this meal was one Brian would probably not enjoy quite so much.

Every night, they would stand outside the turkey shed calling out, “Briaaan…oh, Briaaan…Please come out and see us. All we want is a kiss. We just love you so much. Luckily, Brian knew this was a ruse and he never rose to the bait by deciding to wander out for one of those fox kisses.

However, Brian’s Mum, Alan, was very worried about this and she felt like she needed to protect her son, just like any normal turkey Mum would.

“Brian,” said Mum Alan. “Your Dad (Alan) and myself have been talking and we don’t believe you are safe here. It is only a matter of time before those foxes get their filthy paws on you and enjoy that meal that they have pursued for so long. I can’t go through this every night, my love, with those brutes outside taunting you and calling out your name. It’s too much for my old heart.”

Brian was unsure where this was going.

“We’ve just finished face-timing your Uncle Alan in Texas and he has told us that you can go and stay with him until your mascara obsession subsides.”

Brian was distraught. “What about my Alan, my girlfriend?” he replied. “What will happen to us? Our relationship?”

“There will be other Alans,” replied his Mum. “Plus, you can’t let a little thing like that get in the way of your safety. Let’s be fair son, she’s no oil painting and also if your love is really that strong, I am sure Alan will wait for you. There is also a chance that you may decide the USA is for you and if that is the case, Alan may decide to join you.”

“But what if she falls in love with someone else whilst I’m gone?” continued a worried Brian.

“Seriously mate,” snapped his mum. “She’s a horse Brian, she’ll be spending her life alone. She’s going nowhere, I promise you.”

“What about my family? My friends?” asked Brian.

“Turkey family, turkey friends, are there for life Brian, you know that. We will be in touch with you constantly.” Mum was getting angry now.

“What am I going to do out there?

“Well that’s the funny thing,” Mum now had a slight glint in her eye. “Your Uncle Alan’s son, your cousin…Alan, he’s just got a job on the rodeo.”

“Rodeo?” replied Alan. “What’s rodeo?”

Questions:

  1. What is the downside of Brian’s mascara wearing obsession? (1 mark)
  2. Where did the foxes want to go for their meal? (1 mark)
  3. Why weren’t the foxes invited to the turkey’s buffet style events? Was this active discrimination? (2 marks)
  4. What was Mum worried about? (1 mark)
  5. Why didn’t Brian want to leave the farm? (2 marks)
  6. Do you feel that Brian’s mum respected girlfriend Alan? Explain your reasoning? (2 marks)
  7. Do you think Brian will change his mind about Texas or about rodeo or both? Explain your reasoning. (2 marks)
Maths

Join Year 6 Maths Drop-in Zoom Meeting (11:30)

https://zoom.us/j/98482430346?pwd=WFBlY1oxMFZEY0NHbE5aMUZabTFNQT09

Meeting ID: 921 7829 6497
Passcode: u9PLRP

Video Input to the maths lesson:

Maths Meeting:

Maths: LC: Algebra: Solve simple one-step equations

Today we continue to look at Algebra. We are now looking at solving simple one-step equations. PLEASE use the video as a revision form. The video will DEFINITELY help to guide you and explain further so please watch it carefully and return to it as many times as is needed.

You will be looking at writing algebraic equations, solving equations and solving algebraic problems. Please ensure that you are comfortable with the focus today and ensure that if you need help not to struggle but instead pop into the Zoom session. It may be just a little thing needed to push you forward.

Challenge questions:

History

Join Year 6 Afternoon Drop-in Zoom Meeting (2:00)

https://zoom.us/j/97013405587?pwd=bG9yc0JaamhxOVAyMXlGVFlESEd1Zz09

Meeting ID: 970 1340 5587
Passcode: uq1h9q

Today’s video for history:

Today in history we are going to look at the Victorian Prison and consider how crime was dealt with during Victorian times. We will learn what life was like for someone sent to prison then, what the conditions were like and the punishments they had to endure for their crimes.

You are then going to write a diary entry taken from the perspective of a prisoner and what life was like for you within those establishments.

Please watch and listen to the video to help guide you further about what is expected this afternoon.

What to consider for a diary entry:

  1. Date
  2. Dear Diary
  3. Informal voice
  4. Thoughts, feeling and emotions
  5. First person
  6. Past tense
Story time

Searching for Treasure by Annabel Pitcher

Alex lay on his bedroom carpet and sighed. It was that kind of day. The world was exhaling thick, grey breath and the bird’s lungs were filled with lead. Even the flowers seemed unable to lift their heads, or so Alex imagined. He couldn’t be bothered to lift his own head to peer out of the window and look at the garden.

It was that kind of day. Again.

Rolling on his stomach, Alex shut his eyes and buried his face in his blue, fluffy rug. His door flew open. “Quick! Quick! There’s a -” a voice started, and then stopped. “What are you doing?”

“Go away, George,” Alex said. George, his younger brother, entered the room instead. “I’m sleeping.”

“Liar.”

Alex opened one eye. “What are you doing? Apart from annoying me.”

George grinned. He performed a spin in his bright, green wellies, then tucked his thumbs beneath the shoulder straps of his dinosaur rucksack. “We’re going on an adventure. Like we used to.”

Alex shook his head. “Nah. You’re all right.”

“But didn’t you see it?” George asked.

“See what?”

George hopped over Alex’s legs, then dashed to the window. “The rainbow, of course!”

Alex crawled after him, grabbed hold of the radiator and pulled himself up. “There’s nothing but fog mate.”

“Above the fog,” George replied. “You’ll need special binoculars.” He made a pair out of his hands and held them to Alex’s face. “See it?”

Alex was about to say no. He always said no lately, but his brother’s hands were small and clammy with excitement. “Oh yeah,” he said, pretending to adjust the focus by twiddling George’s little finger. “It moved something inside him as well. “You’re right.”

George dropped to his knees. “I plotted it on a map!” he said, rooting through his rucksack. “Here.” He held up a page torn from an atlas. “The pot of gold is in…” His eyes shone as he pointed at the town he’d circled in pink felt-tip pen. “…Blackpool.”

“Hmm,” Alex said.”Yeah, OK!” He stuffed the map back into his rucksack, then paused. “Are you actually coming? Actually, actually?”

“You need some help finding this gold, right?”

“Yeah,” George said, but he didn’t move. He was staring out of the window. The mist had thinned to reveal a nondescript sky. “But what if there isn’t really a rainbow?” he asked, his fingers and face all in a knot. “I can’t really see one.”

“Can’t you?” Alex replied. He made some binoculars out of his own hands, then held them up to his brother’s face. Somewhere outside, a bird burst into song or perhaps it had been singing all along. Flowers lifted their heads towards a sky, a day, a world filling with colour. “I can.”

Daily Work Feedback – Year 6
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